Attendre et Espérer

by The Duke of Norfolk

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  • Digital Album
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    Pre-order of Attendre et Espérer. You get 2 tracks now (streaming via the free Bandcamp app and also available as a high-quality download in MP3, FLAC and more), plus the complete album the moment it’s released.
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    releases June 15, 2018

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1.
2.
Kharon
3.
Shema
4.
Plath (Interlude #1)
5.
The Bell Jar Descends
6.
Kaddish (Interlude #2)
7.
Pale the Ghost / Sharp the Edge
8.
Loch Lerna
9.
Jerusalem (Interlude #3)
10.
The Waters Below
11.
Memento Mori
12.

about

Late in the summer of 2015 my father left. Nobody knows where the leaving go.

Seeing death so close, I began–as many do–to see death everywhere. I saw him in distant wars & with starving children, with the still-born baby & the teenage suicide, indiscriminately picking from the old and the young. Present in the daily newspaper and in ancient myths, the question of every scripture and a pulsing undertone of the romantic poets.

Though there is nothing to say that is yet unsaid, there is comfort in the saying.

This album is for Jerry Howard and for Barbara King and everyone they left behind; for Sandy Howard, Jordan Howard, Hanna Hutchinson, and David Bard. It is for everyone who leaves & everyone who is left. 

Grief is the price of love & it is always paid too soon.

-Adam Howard / Feb 18, 2018

credits

releases June 15, 2018

Written by Adam Howard

Recorded & Performed by Adam Howard with the help of:
Cameron Reed - Cello
Jodi Reed - Violin
Hanna Haas - additional vocals
Bethany Shorey Fennell - Clarinet

Mastered by Adam Gonsalves at Telegraph Mastering

Additional thanks to Henry Fennell & Bethany Shorey Fennell for providing a space in which to record, Caroline Overy for consistently giving thoughtful and invaluable feedback, Claire Laurensen, Roseanne Watt, and Stuart & Paul Thomson for taking me to Shetland to clear my head and for playing the songs with me until they found reliable shapes, to Hanna Hutchinson & Ali Burress for encouraging me during the sometimes discouraging process of bringing this album into the world—you told me it was good and I believed you—and to everyone who has inspired and provoked me in conversation during the years spanning its creation (especially Peter Myers & Paul Abbey); you are too many to name but too dear to be forgotten.

Texts & Samples Used (by track #):

1. Lyrics adapted from 'Do Not Go Gentle Into that Good Night' by Dylan Thomas (1951).
3. Text ('Quant à vous, Morrel…') from 'Le Comte De Monte Cristo' by Alexandre Dumas (1844) read by Éric Herson-Macarel for Sixtrid's 2015 audio production of the book.
4. Text from 'The Bell Jar' by Sylvia Plath read by Maggie Gyllenhaal for HarperAudio's 2003 audio production of the book.
6. Traditional Jewish Prayer of Mourning.
9. Text ('I caught a glimpse of the meaning of death…') from 'Manalive' by G.K. Chesterton (1912) read by Alastair Smith. Lyrics from 'And Did Those Feet In Ancient Time' by William Blake (1808) with melody adapted from 'Jerusalem' by Sir Hubert Parry (1916).
11. Lyrics adapted from 'If I Should Die' by Emily Dickinson (1892 published posthumously).
12. Text from 'Le Comte De Monte Cristo' by Alexandre Dumas (1844) read by Madeleine Brossier.

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The Duke of Norfolk Portland, Oregon

The Duke of Norfolk is a peripatetic singer/songwriter from Oklahoma.

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Track Name: Dylan Thomas / Bitter Bitter
Heavy the rain doth pour and heavy the tongue.
The light does miss the forested face.
Bitter, bitter the pendulum swung

Bitter, bitter the pendulum swung

Open the sky for me and cut out the heart
the fruit does spoil the children’s laughter
Bitter, bitter the blackest of arts

‘Good men, the last wave by, crying how bright’
the sun does try despite the shadow
Bitter, bitter ‘the dying of the light’

Bitter, bitter the dagger in the fight
Track Name: Shema Reprise / Attendre et Espérer
‘Vivez donc et soyez heureux, enfants chéris de mon cœur, et n’oubliez jamais que, jusqu’au jour où Dieu daignera dévoiler l’avenir à l’homme, toute la sagesse humaine sera dans ces deux mots : Attendre et espérer !’